IndieWebCamp is a 2-day creator camp focused on growing the independent web

FAQ

Indie Web Camp Frequently Asked Questions

Contents

How to answer a question

If someone asks a question, e.g. on IRC, about how to do something:

  1. Search the wiki for an answer. Search the wiki for keywords in the question, similar words, etc.
  2. Brainstorm in the IRC channel. If you don't quickly find an answer on the wiki, then try to brainstorm something similar to other questions/answers, in the IRC channel.
  3. Write up new answers on the wiki. If we come up with any remotely reasonable/useful answers, write it up as a stub on the wiki.
  4. Crosslink from related pages. Lastly, link to the new page or answer from similar/relevant pages to increase its discoverability for (1).

What is new

Q: What's new?

A: Check out the following to see what's new in the IndieWeb community:

What are the most important things about an indieweb site

Q: What would you say are the most important things about an indieweb site?

A: After getting started, follow the IndieMark levels.

Who is the audience for IndieWebCamp events

Q: Who is the target audience for Indie Web Camp events?

A: IndieWebCamp events are for anyone works on their own personal website, and shares at least some of that work openly (open source, open design, open UX). Are you a creator? Do you work on projects? Join us.

What is the purpose of IndieWebCamp events

Q: What is the purpose of Indie Web Camp events?

A: IndieWebCamp is a 2-day creator camp focused on growing the independent web.

The purpose of IndieWebCamp is to gather creators of all backgrounds to help each other own our own content, permalinks, and identity on the web, rather than just posting to third-party content silos.

We do this at IndieWebCamps with two days of brainstorming & creating, and advance & grow the indie web, using our own personal websites as exemplars.

What is a personal website

Q: What is a personal website?

A: A personal website is website that is at a personal-domain, with permalinks & posts that you control, rather than at a 3rd party silo.

If you have multiple personal domains, just pick one that you want to start blogging on.

E.g. if you have one with your name, start with that one.

How do I export my data

Q: How do I export my data from various services? AKA

  • Is there a list of data liberation options?
  • How to get your __[type of data]__ out of __[cloud service]__?

A: The information about how to export your data from each silo is available on the wiki page for that silo. E.g.

See the silos page for a list of popular silos. If you have an account somewhere not listed there, go ahead and add such silos to the silos page and ask in IRC if anyone has any experience exporting from it/them.

Who are we making software for

"Q: Who are we making software for?"

A: Make software for yourself which you use daily and rely on, instead of targeting some other demographic.[1]

See also:

How should I markup my blog

"Q: How should I markup my blog?"

A: Use a classic microformat on the body of each page. For your index page, use an h-card. For your individual permalink pages, use h-entry.

For all of the data on your pages, use microformats2.

Is everyone going to want to run their own website

Q: Is everyone going to want to run their own website?

A: There are historical precedents for this question:

  • Is everyone going to want to run their own personal computer?
  • Is everyone going to want to run their own (cell) phone (number)?

The answer used to be no, until it became obvious that the answer was yes.

Currently not everyone wants to run their own website, partially because it's not clear why, and partially because there's no one-click-install for the IndieWeb. We're solving both of those problems.

For now, those who want to run their own sites can, and those who don't want to don't have to.

There will be network effects (e.g. with peer-to-peer federated indieweb comments) as more people do so in the future. But the great thing is that if you are publishing on your own site, you are getting an immediate benefit out of it now (extra control and flexibility), and are still syndicating to existing social network silos like Twitter and Facebook.

Is this just federated social networks

Q: Aren't you just talking about federation?

A: Federated social networks and distributed social networks have been touted as an answer to the same problem indie web people are trying to solve. It's not the same. Having federated social networks would probably be an improvement on having single silo services, but it still doesn't put the individual user in control. With an indie web approach, the individual is the primary actor in the network rather than the network.

In a federated social network, it may be the case that there is some equality and transparency and compatibility between services like Twitter, Facebook, status.net, Google+ etc., the networks rather than the individuals are still the primary actors.

With an indieweb approach, the individual users control their own identity, control their own publishing process and syndication (see POSSE) and networking is secondary.

It also doesn't mean that we have to sit around and wait for big sites to agree on protocols (often decided behind closed doors, and often far too hard for individuals to implement) and can just publish stuff on the web.

Is there an IndieWeb mailing list

Q: Is there an IndieWeb mailing list?

A: No. We use IRC. We're beyond mailing lists. One of the reasons people in the IndieWeb community are particularly productive is that there's no mailing list of talkers to distract creators.

Also: short IRC messages 24x7 worldwide scale much better than paragraphs of emails.

How do you hash stuff out

Q: How do you hash stuff out?

A: IRC. Sometimes blog posts on our own blogs with proposals. Sometimes we meetup in person. Sometimes proposals on wiki pages, followed up with IRC or in-person chats. Sometimes someone just ships something on their own site and asks, hey folks, what do you think of this?

What if my timezone is very different

Q: What if my timezone is very different from those I want to discuss with?

A: You'd be surprised. We're a round-the-clock multi-timezone crew. We read the IRC logs, chat, sometimes leave short txt messages to each other via "!tell".

Beyond the US, we have active community members in the UK, France, Belgium, Germany, India, Hong Kong.

Any books or posts on federated networks

Q: Do you have any good books / posts you would recommend on the subject of federated networks?

A: There are no good books on the subject of federated networks because there are no good federated networks. Yet. Email may have had a glimmer but is being crushed under overwhelming spam and will die as a result.

There are many aspirational posts about federated social networks (e.g. [2]) but few and far between are actual good posts about them. Here is a list of a few:

Is the indieweb giving in to silos with POSSE and backfeed

Q: Is the indieweb conforming to what silos want instead of the other way around by POSSEing and using backfeeds of comments/activities? If all the silo comments/activities will end up on my site what is the incentive for my friends there to go indie?

A: Through POSSE+backfeed your site will aggregate all the activity and responses to your posts.

Your site has more than any one silo; the most complete experience around a piece of content.

This is a good incentive for readers to visit your site instead of a silo-copy.

By seeing how much better your indieweb profile is than any of their silo profiles, it may motivate them to go 'indie' as well. Help them do so!

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see also

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