IndieWebCamp is a 2-day creator camp focused on growing the independent web

generations

(Redirected from barriers)

Generations in the context of the indieweb refer to clusters of potential IndieWeb adopters in a series of waves that are expected to naturally adopt the indieweb for themselves and then help inform the next generation. Each generation is expected to lower barriers for adoption successively for the next generation.

Diagram showing IndieWeb Generations.

The concept of a Generation allows us to group the experience of a group into a cluster that we can build tools for and create language to encourage growth. The term "Generation" does not have to be a permanent name but it is a good way to begin organizing thoughts about how we explain the value of the IndieWeb to people with different backgrounds.

Contents

Generational Inertia

Note that it's going to be very difficult for Generation 1 IndieWeb group to understand how Generation 4 IndieWeb group sees terms like DNS, Hosting, Domain Registry, etc. Each Generation should be best at explaining IndieWeb to the next Generation. Each Generation should focus on filling in the gaps between one generation to the next.

Many experienced web developers that are new to the IndieWeb often wonder how the IndieWeb will be possible to join by someone who has never registered a domain before. We suggest an incremental approach (stair step model) where we can slowly iterate towards larger groups that have less core experience with web development and are more silo oriented in their experience of the web.

Bridging the Generations

Ryan Barrett's Brid.gy is literally a bridge from Generation 1 to Generation 2 understanding and adoption of the IndieWeb because it allows Generation 2 to own their content on their own site, post to a silo, but also get the conversation from the silo posted back on their own site. This is an even better outcome

Cost of Upkeep

When you own something there's a burden of upkeep. Many people are running WordPress 2.0 and they're unaware the cost of upkeep. This is an aspect that will need to be addressed for Gen 2,3,4. When you make your own tech or use 3rd party tech there's still a bit of bit rot that happens.

From discussion with Ariel Waldman and Matt Biddulph on the IndieWeb: Matt Biddulph: "I have consciously divested myself of running certain technologies and have become flexible with adapting to what makes sense to use at a certain time".

IndieWeb Generations

Generation 1 Generation 2 Generation 3 Generation 4
Capable of building a CMS, custom blogging software, understands SSL, git, SSH, APIs, domain registrars, DNS, nameservers, communicating over IRC, and editing wikis, and is comfortable running a server to host their own content, and knows at least one basic web-based programming language. Comfortable with lengthy documentation. Understands cPanel, Softaculous, Fantastico, etc. has a domain name and blog. Has a domain but the content is hosted by a 3rd party on Wordpress.com, Tumblr, etc and can register a domain and follow a tutorial to point Nameservers at the proper address. Has never purchased their own domain name and has only used 3rd party software. Easily turned off by industry jargon like DNS, Hosting, Servers, silos, Domain Registrars. Never bought a domain name before or run a personal site. Has never seen a server, cPanel or Nameserver prompt.

Generation 1 IndieWeb

Introducing Gen1 to the IndieWeb:

  • Demo the basic concepts of POSSE, backfeed, Webmention and Microformats and the purpose of each.
  • Show individual some example best practices for user experience and stress that homespun posting interfaces do not need to be professional looking or perfect as they're use
  • Stress the IndieWeb principles like data ownership, selfdogfooding, and show before tell. Encourage individual to "scratch their own itches", create and iterate on their own site.
  • Point individual to #indiewebcamp on IRC and link to documentation on the Wiki for further exploration and engagement.
  • Encourage individual to attend or start a Homebrew Website Club.

Generation 2 IndieWeb

Introducing Gen2 to the IndieWeb:

  • Demo basic concepts of POSSE, Bridgy, Webmention and Microformats.
  • Show the value of the IndieWeb to this generation by showing demos of backfeed technologies like Bridgy.
  • Discuss existing tools and CMS that can be configured relatively quickly.
  • If individual is running WordPress, discuss IndieWeb WordPress plugins individual can install to get 'IndieWebified'.
  • Encourage individual to attend or start a Homebrew Website Club.

ToDo: Add user stories from Dan Gillmor and Scott Jenson on the barriers getting basic IndieWeb methods set up on their sites and what their breakthroughs were.

Super vocal bloggers who are very frustrated are more likely to understand the value of IndieWeb concepts early on.

Note: Events and Indie Event RSVP should be added during the transition from Generation 2-3.

NB selfdogfood is a potentially offputting term for 2nd and subsequent generations. We should come up with something that sounds less unpleasant.

Generation 3 IndieWeb

Introducing Gen3 to the IndieWeb:

  • This is possible but Gen2 needs to take precedence first so that the experience is better for Gen3's.

Example of a Generation 3 individual's reaction to IndieWebify.me:

May help to set expectations and figure out ways to reach out to this crowd when we get to that point.

Generation 4 IndieWeb

Know that even getting a Generation 4 person to associate a custom domain name with a Tumblr account requires signing up for a domain name, pointing Nameservers to the proper address, and finally adding some HTML to the page. It is very important to understand that this generation is easily overwhelmed by any software or user interfaces not made for the general public.

There are many unanswered questions on how a Generation 4 might do this without Tumblr. Hosting, the ides of a public_html folder, using a hosting company's interface to edit the HTML of a personal website, using Bootstrap or Jetstrap, installing Wordpress, downloading an FTP client to edit HTML, is quite complex for someone new to owning their own domain.

Ideally one would get a full understanding of Git and use something like Sublime Text to edit code, but this is truly above and beyond.

Introducing Gen4 to the IndieWeb:

  • Introducing Gen4 to the IndieWeb is not yet reasonable at this time.